Illustrations in the Secret of the Seven Ships

Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz

cover: Krzysztof Krawiec, Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz, based on Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Met, New York
p. 11 fragment of view of Motława by Balthasar Friedrich Leizel, Friedrich Antona August Lohrmann, c. 1780, coloured engraving, National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk

p. 20 Jan van Eyck, the Arnolfini Portrait, the National gallery, London
p. 23 Gedanum from Civitates orbis Terrarum by Georg Braun, Franz Hogenberg), 1575, engraving, National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk
pp. 25, 31, 32, 48 Gdańsk during and after WW II, gedanopedia.pl
p. 37 Frederick II by Hans Knieper and Eric XVI by Steven van der Meulen, Nationalmuseum
p. 43 St George and the dragon by Bernt Notke, Storkyrkan in Stockholm
p. 45 fragment of an archival chest by Dariusz Kula, Museum of Gdańsk, Main Town Hall
p. 50 State Archives in Gdańsk
p. 52 Margaret of Parma by Anthonis Mor
p. 53 Sigismund II Augustus by Lucas Cranach
p. 56 Green Bridge and Gate by Aegidius Dickmann, 1617, gedanopedia.pl
p. 59 Green Gate, 1687, gedanopedia.pl
p. 58 Lastadia, Julius Gottheil, 1845 gedanopedia.pl
p. 60 The Long Market 1880, gedanopedia.pl
p. 61 Raised terrace by Johann Carl Schultz 1867 gedanopedia.pl
p. 62 Artus Court by August Lobegott Randt, 1823, gedanopedia.pl
p. 63 Konstantin Ferber by Nicolaus Andrea, 1586, gedanopedia.pl
p. 64 Town Hall by Michael Carl Gregorovius, 1832, gedanopedia.pl
p. 65 Figure on the pinnacle of the Town Hall, based on Jan Gumowski, 1928 (there incorrectly referenced to as  John II Casimir Vasa), National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk
p. 67 entrance to Great Christopher by Dariusz Kula, Museum of Gdańsk, Main Town Hall
p. 68 on the basis of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Met, New York, Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz
p. 69 on the basis of the fresco in Great Christopher by Dariusz Kula, Gdańsk Historical Museum, Town Hall
p. 73 Henry VIII by Hans Holbein, 1540
p. 75 exterior of the National Museum and the Last Judgement by Hans Memling, 1467-1471, the National Museum in Gdańsk
pp. 76-77 fragments of the Last Judgement,  the National Museum in Gdańsk
p. 79 cellars and the Great Council Hall, by Dariusz Kula, Museum of Gdańsk, Main Town Hall
pp. 80-81 Apotheosis by Isaak van den Block, Museum of Gdańsk, Main Town Hall
pp. 82-83 fresco and archival chest in fresco in Great Christopher by Dariusz Kula, Museum of Gdańsk, Main Town Hall
p. 89 Georg Giese by Hans Holbein
p. 97 State Archives in Gdańsk
p. 96 fresco in Great Christopher by Dariusz Kula, Gdańsk Historical Museum, Town Hall
p. 104 Panorama of Gdańsk, by Bartholomaus Milwitz, 1620-1630, MNG/SD/281/M, the National Museum
p. 107 astronomical clock, St Mary’s, Gdańsk
p. 108 view of Motława by Balthasar Friedrich Leizel, Friedrich Antona August Lohrmann, c. 1780, coloured engraving, National Maritime Museum in Gdańsk

Latest Blog Posts

History in conflict webinar: introducing the early modern edition

Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz

Did people in premodern times understand what the past was, and were they able to engage with it or even use it to their advantage? In his influential essay Vergangene Zukunft (1968, in English as Futures Past, 1985), Reinhart Koselleck argued that the premodern (Western) understanding of the past was quite different from the modern one. The past was seen as part of a sequence of cycles in nature and lifetimes, as part of a theological framework which could not be captured by secular chronology, or as a reservoir of timeless tales which could be directly applied as lessons. Judith Pollmann (Memory in early modern Europe, 2017) has rightly pointed out that this essay was a contribution to the philosophy of history, and not an analysis of premodern social practices. She showed in her work that the engagement with the past was rich, widespread and that no sharp line can be drawn between the premodern and the modern in this respect. A complex sense of – and by extension, a sophisticated use of – the past is not only a modern phenomenon.

In our series of webinars, we use the magnifying glass of conflicts to reveal this complexity and sophistication in detail. The authors of the papers demonstrate that there was a premodern understanding of the past which could be very specific and pragmatic, for instance when pointing to the dates of business deals or riots. But there was also an understanding that the past could be perceived and narrated very differently (in accounts of quarrels),  that it could be negotiated (in diplomatic settings) or obliterated (in archives, landscapes or social customs). In our discussions, the magnifying glass is applied to primary sources in order to discuss the role the past played in conflicts. The connecting question of the webinars is ‘What happened in a conflict situation when one put references to the past – history – memory – precedent on the table?’ The enumerated temporal concepts, obviously, are not identical. Some are more fitting to a judicial context (precedent), while others are more fitting to a context where the experience of the past is key (memory). What they do have in common in the context we examine here by way of experiment is a clear function in handling the conflict. [....]

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